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Tomson

Canon G11, Tips of photographing the RS

Hi All,

I have just bought a Canon G11.  

I want to take some great shots of the RS6+, any tips.  

I have been looking at some of the shots on here and they are amazing, take Huices shots of his RS4 in the Multi storey - awesome.

Any Tips for a beginner who is keen to learn?

Thanks,

Tomson
Stigter

yeah, just have a look at the strobist dvd or watch video's on youtube, the g11 has the hotshoe and is a quality bit of kit.

This kicked it all off for me, messing around with exposure and a strobe.


Link


Tomson

SO I need to buy a speedlight?
TimG007

Stigter wrote:
yeah, just have a look at the strobist dvd or watch video's on youtube, the g11 has the hotshoe and is a quality bit of kit.

This kicked it all off for me, messing around with exposure and a strobe.



Stunning picture  
Stigter

Tomson wrote:
SO I need to buy a speedlight?


No, I took that by using the flash just holding in my hand and triggering it manually (the flash was a cheap old flash) while the camera button was down in manual mode - IMPORTANT!!! don't use any flash that isn't designed to run on digital camera or it could kill you camera.

Gives you an idea on how it works. Settings on the camera and stuff and some things you can buy.


Link
Stigter

Check this chap out, using long exposure takes a pic with bonnett up in dark, sets camera to start taking the image (opens shutter) lights up the area he wants to show in the picture - then closes bonnett to continue picture and he ends up with see through images. Awesome images of A5.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/27863734@N04/3177959085/in/photostream/


Hope it gives you ideas.  

Another two from the same night:



bluebrakes

Re: Canon G11, Tips of photographing the RS

Tomson wrote:
Hi All,

I have just bought a Canon G11.  

I want to take some great shots of the RS6+, any tips.  

I have been looking at some of the shots on here and they are amazing, take Huices shots of his RS4 in the Multi storey - awesome.

Any Tips for a beginner who is keen to learn?

Thanks,

Tomson


A good tripod, low light shots like these are near impossible to shoot without a good tripod. Especially where you're 'painting with light' and need a long exposure.

You don't really need a flashgun at all. So long as the exposure is long enough for you to light up the various areas of the car with a torch, those areas will show up quite nicely on the camera.

Just remember, the longer exposure, thelonger it takes for the camera to process the image and generally the more noise you get in the final picture too. However, if you're good at photoshop, this can be removed almost competely.

Night shots like this, i would recommend putting the camera in manual mode, so you have complete control of the setting.
Stigter

Stuff like this at night is just interesting.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adcuz/3244632011/

This guy gives good reason for using flashes.


Link


and cheers TimG007  
bluebrakes

Usually shots like that are done in multiple shots mergerd together, all taken from the same position on a tripod.

Layer it up in photoshop and gently erase the areas to show up the layer underneath with the details you want.

The guy probably did a long exposure of the traffic going past first, another shot for the s3 and a shot for the sky. You would need to be mega lucky to crack that in one shot, as in winning the lottery lucky.
Stigter

bluebrakes wrote:
Usually shots like that are done in multiple shots mergerd together, all taken from the same position on a tripod.

Layer it up in photoshop and gently erase the areas to show up the layer underneath with the details you want.

The guy probably did a long exposure of the traffic going past first, another shot for the s3 and a shot for the sky. You would need to be mega lucky to crack that in one shot, as in winning the lottery lucky.


One shot -  did you read his description.
"Strobed Audi S3. Just over 8 minute exposure.
Car and strobe provided by And. I strobed the car and then drove away (In my own car) into the vanishing point seen in the image, turned round (got stuck in the mud during this shot) and then drove down The road seen bearing off behind the S3.
Slight edits in photoshop: Cloned out a trail from the LED on the strobe. Added a vignette so the grass wasn't such a distraction."

here is the picture if anyone is lost. ( http://www.flickr.com/photos/adcuz/3244632011/sizes/l/ )

Anyway - I am not a photographer just throwing some ideas out there which worked well for me and gave me some good ideas then just the norm.  
bluebrakes

too perfect. Quite some tweaking would have needed to be done there. Not entirely convinced.

Fair play to the bloke though.

People find different techniques work best for them, it doesn't mean you're doing it the right way or wrong way. So long as it works for you, and gives you the end result that's all that matters.
Tomson

Thanks guys this is all very interesting and very tempting to mess about with.

Although I think I need to learn how to set the camera up in manual mode prior to strobing or messing about with dirfferent lighting.

For example without the switch to lock the camera open, what settings would you go for to keep the shuitter open as long as possible.

Apologies for the real basics here on photography, but I really want to learn.

No problems if you can just point me in the direction of a good website where I can read, or any good books.

I think I need to learn the basics of Aperture, shutter speed and ISO - before getting to far ahead of myself.

Tomson
bluebrakes

Aperture - Just like the iris of your own eye. It controls the amount of light entering the camera but it also has an effect on DOF (depth of field).

Shutter Speed - speaks for itself. It can be used to create blur effects and light trials on slow shutter speeds or freeze frame something moving very quickly. It can have an overall effect on the exposure of the image. Too slow and you can burn an image, to fast and it's too dark.

ISO or film speed - controls the sensitivity of the camera to light. Although the higher you go has a side effect of adding noise (grainy effect) to the image.

All these variables are all interlinked with getting the image right. you can compensate one for the other and vice versa.
Tomson

I have been having a play in AV mode at the moment and reading various bits and bobs on-line.  I think it will be a case of trial and error.

Thanks  for all your help chaps
rik

You will need a decent torch, and a tripod, or something that works as a tripod - I keep a gorillapod with my G7, but a table works just as well, if you have a few random thin things to stuff under the camera to tilt it forwards or back if you need to.

Use Tv mode and set it as long as it goes, and use ISO 400 to start with. Use the Self Timer so that you can press the button and let go before it takes the picture, so it doesn't wobble when it's taking the picture, and as soon as it starts to actually take the picture paint your car with light from the torch. Nice even strokes to start with. When it's done have a look at the resulting image. If you want to highlight something put light on for longer. If you lit it too much paint it a little faster then stop lighting it.

When there's no light going in to the camera it won't record any info there, so what you're doing is providing enough light selectively, and doing a little bit of trial and error.


There's no need to apologise for asking to learn something. There's no such thing as a stupid question, either - it means we've not explained something properly.

Please post up when you're done - I want to see what you can do and see if there's anything I can learn too. I assume there is
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