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 Never Say Never Again - One DIY project too far... View next topic
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BNBboyo
Skilled


Car: Audi S4 B5
Power: Tasty
Torque: Tastier

Joined: 14 Sep 2012
Posts: 1435

Location: South Wales

PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 1:39 am  Reply with quoteBack to top

Have read from page 8 onwards and grited my teeth when the dam springs were the culprit on the paddle..had a feeling tbh lol...interesting read and as I want to put a refurbed rear subframe on next with new rubber mounts, bolts etc etc etc...did u go for standard rear bushes? They look standard so assume so?

Great read Im going to read backwards now lol
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ScottR
Veteran


Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 2:05 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Yes, all stock bushes. Glad I've been able to put the clutch nightmare behind me with an OEM RS4 kit.
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madmax2
knowledgeable


Car: S4 Noggy
Power: 360
Torque: 500

Joined: 07 Mar 2015
Posts: 308


PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:43 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I loved reading this whole thread, a true love affair with this car.
I'm going ot keep checking back until you have replaced the rear window seals that you photographed on page1 Dying to find out if there is a quick way to do it..I've read of someone doing it with the window in place, but would prefer reading it here with pics, because you write so well.
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ScottR
Veteran


Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 4:45 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Final furlong

It was such a massive relief to see the rear end going back together.  And especially pleasing to see how much cleaner it now looked.  But I still had a hell of a lot to do.  With 10 days (most of which i'd be working) to go, I had to knuckle down and squeeze in some DIY action wherever I could.

After getting home from work on such a lovely summer day, I thought i'd start with a nice simple job which would have a very high sense of reward - mating the gearbox to the engine ready for the final push.


But... disaster struck!  What had always been around a 5-10 minute job for me was taking much longer.  Then it took much longer again.  In fact, this cycle of much longerishness repeated for a frankly unbelievable 4 hours.  

Looking back on it now, this is very apt...


And although I get full marks for persistence, I got zero for skill or application!   Finally I threw in the towel, and started this thread which alerted me to the possible causes.

Whilst I waited for the AudiSRS massive to set me straight, I felt I had to at least achieve something that day.  Moved onto something far less simple than the previous task.  Foolish boy!

I realised that because my new braided rear brake lines replaced both the flexi bit and the small hardline from the wishbone,  they weren't going to fit the OEM brackets.  Furthermore, because the hardline attached to the rear subframe had been shortened a bit to fit the new union, something cunning would have to be done.  I arrived upon a cunning little bodge.  I'd use a small piece of 22mm copper pipe, then crush it to shape.  This would not only keep the flexi from physically touching the metal bracket, but would also help space out to allow the hardline to keep keep some tension on the flexi hose, which would keep it all in place.  An added bonus was that i could also prevent the flexi from spinning as I tightened the union.

Pics speak a thousand words.  This first one says "what a blurry good idea!" (you can make out the OEM sprung clip which keeps tension on the OEM pipes - my bodge retains this)



Once both sides were fitted, I gave the copper a taste of Hammerite to keep it all looking neat and tidy.

Another small job was to bring the pass side downpipe inboard a little more.  It was always very close to the underside of the transmission tunnel, so a few minutes with a decent round file allowed me to open up the holes a tiny bit to give me a few more mm's clearance.  Not exactly desperately needed, but couldn't hurt.



The following night after work I turned my attention to sorting out the leaking rear diff.  In true bodger style, I knocked up a 'cradle' for the diff out of an old piece of stud wall and some bricks so I could let the oil drain whilst I got on with the next job.


The wiring pass side ABS sensor is combined with the wiring for the xenon angle sensor.   And these wires all feed through a very think little aluminium tube.  God knows why the engineers decided to do this!  Result is, in order to change this, you need to remove the wires from the connector and feed them through.  Some careful use of a trim pick and a precision screwdriver was needed.

This photo shows exactly how things close up to me look with my failing eyesight:


And in this crappy photo, you can just about make out the tiny wee aluminium tube it needed to be fed through.


By the time that done, the diff oil had mostly drained.  Used a couple of driveshaft bolts and a crowbar to get some leverage so the flanges could be removed.


First Diff Flange removed:


Looks like i'd found the source of my soggy diff bottom.


I took a peak inside and noticed something.  Glad I did.  There was a spring piece which had come away from the seal:



It was beginning to get dark by the time I got the remaining flange out.  I realised I wasn't going to have time to fit the seals and get it all back together easily with the light failing, and didn't want to rush the job.  I wrapped the diff in black pallet wrap to keep it water tight... and to stop the garden rats making a new next overnight!


But, the garage has a light and my hammer has an 'ite'

Cleaned up the grubby flanges and...


Time to let these babies dry overnight...
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jockthedog
Experienced


Car: S4-B5.3
Power: C5-RS6Plus
Torque: in' hell!
Engine code: 0xFA

Joined: 14 Mar 2011
Posts: 2976

Location: Moonbase Alpha

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:09 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

That tiny spring normally sits inside the grease groove in the seal itself, and you'll have dislodged it when you wrangled the seal out.
I often find these springs lying on the workshop floor after removing a seal and I always check inside the front of the gearbox in case one has come off and fallen in.

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ScottR
Veteran


Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:19 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

jockthedog wrote:
That tiny spring normally sits inside the grease groove in the seal itself, and you'll have dislodged it when you wrangled the seal out.
I often find these springs lying on the workshop floor after removing a seal and I always check inside the front of the gearbox in case one has come off and fallen in.


It was still in place on one seal, and not the other, which was the reason I went hunting.  
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FalleN
knowledgeable


Car: Cactus S4 B5 saloon
Power: stock
Torque: stock
Engine code: AGB

Joined: 06 Feb 2014
Posts: 494

Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 6:48 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Nice work, again!

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ScottR
Veteran


Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2015 9:22 am Reply with quoteBack to top

One step forward and...

In the last exciting episode, I described my torment whilst trying to perform the uber-simple task of mating the engine and gearbox.  It was Bboy82 who mentioned having the same problem that got me back on track.  Yes... I had somehow damaged the splines on the clutch friction plate.

Pointing at some of the damage here with my needle file:


Thankfully, it didn't actually take too long to file these back into a workable shape.  The damage was only at the opening.  It was here that I took Mikey's retrospective advice - always check the clutch fits on the spline first!.  Took me a few goes at filing before I was happy that it was able to get on easily and move freely.

Once that was done, I wasted no time on getting the box fitted.  It took minutes to do!  A lesson to the impatient... if it isn't working, don't keep trying for 4 hours as there is most likely a problem!


Someone asked for a close-up of my DIY Spider Hose.  Et voila!  

Note - I have since replaced the 'heater hose' with proper 1/2" ID fuel hose, as it did not like being subjected to oily vapour and went very soft!  Also replaced the cheapy clips with JCS Hi-Grip.

After all the pain, it was time for the engine to return to it's rightful place.  But before it did, I thought I would try a little trick to help with the invariably painful job of refitting the clutch slave cylinder.  Ben had mentioned using a shoelace to fully compress the slave, which could be cut and slid out of the way when it was bolted in place.
I didn't have a shoelace, so had to make do with a zip-tie.  I was willing to try anything!


The moment of truth...


Looks too good to go back in a car!


Nearly Home...


The clutch slave trick was useless with a zip tie!  It just kept sliding off.  But, I did however find a method with really helped with the refit.  If you unclip the hardline from the bracket and let it swivel, it means the hardline isn't pulling against you.  I was able to get it refitted in record time... less than 30 minutes!  

It was much quicker than my previous attempts, seriously.


SUCCESS!  


I had to leave the car for 10 long days now.  Wifey's friend had selfishly decided to get married in GIbraltar (I think it was either Alan Whicker or Judith Chalmers who summarised the place by saying "It's a shithole on a rock with monkeys and super cheap booze" ).

As I finished tidying up my tools and 'closing the car up' for the duration, I couldn't help but play with one of my new toys and finish just one last job.

You might remember the mighty Thor from my previous exploits.


Well meet his new partner in crime...  Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you the strongest tool in the box, the bright, the bold, the riveting...    HERCULES!!!




And his first task?  I'd never been happy with the routing of the front brake lines since fitting the RS4 fronts.  Think it was SJS who suggested the B7 upright bracket.  Drilled a couple of small holes in the upright and attached a tiny blob of Tigerseal in between the holes to prevent any possible rattling. (photo shows the bracket before i'd rotated it 90 degrees and put in the 2nd rivet)



I could now enjoy a well earned rest.  Only 10 days to fret about returning to the job.  

Time to dig out those speedos!
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ScottR
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Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 9:44 am Reply with quoteBack to top

The Vinegar Strokes

The 10 day holiday had been successful.  I was relaxed, I had managed to get a litre of Jim Beam of 6 and I had been thinking a lot about the remaining jobs on the car.  There really wasn't far left to go now.  It appears that the only downside of the holiday was that I was all photo'd out.  The remainder of this tale therefore, is mostly text.  My apologies to the dwindling numbers who are still following this thread.

Despite the rear end all looking nice and tidy before I left, I had not done the final fitting and tightened everything up.  This was an easy task to start on, but within a very short space of time I had hit a problem.  The outer eccentric bolts weren't turning, ie: I couldn't make any adjustments whatsoever.  I spent a while trying to free them up and just couldn't figure out what was wrong.

Can you tell what it is yet?



That's right...  they were too big to turn!  I must have fit my spare front ones by accident.  

This was a pain in the arse for a few reasons:
1) I had already cleaned up these bolts
2) I was going to have to get the ones off the old rear uprights, which would probably mean waiting a while for Plus Gas to do its thing
3) I had made everything so far look pretty, so I would want to clean up and paint the bolts I was going to pull from the other upright = more waiting for paint to dry!


Getting the old ones off was going to take a lot of Plus Gas!  Thank flip I had replaced all this rusty crud!


A quick side by side of the back plates shows the problem (and the respective conditions ).


And these bolts were going to need a lot of cleaning to ensure they would allow the camber to be adjusted easily.




As I waited for paint to dry, it was on to the task I had been dreading - The Oil Cooler.  You might remember that I had tried to install this during the first engine pull, but gave up due to a combination of time pressures and the fact the pipework just did not want to work.  This time round, I had bought a few additional pieces of RS4 pipework off Jimbo.  The main one being the hard pipe which comes down from the coolant reservoir and connects to the heat exchanger pipework.  It would have meant a big fiddle without that one.  It appears the heat exchanger itself must be slightly different between FL S4 and RS4 as well, but I was able to fashion a short pipe out of an existing hose.

Finally had the pipework hooked up!


And another pic showing how my fabricated pipework fits together in perfect harmony with this tangled web of pipes.


Can't believe how much faffing it required, when fitting the exact same kit to my old PFL S4 had been straight forward without requiring any other pipework.



I had originally planned a more aggressive look for New Thunder - Front splitter, light smoked headlights and light smoked chrome wheels and matching mirrors.  But... this plan was dreamt up before I'd had to pull the engine twice and before i'd realised that the rear subframe and gubbins was coming off.  Sadly, it was a dream never to be realised.  But, the splitter would give the car a slightly different look, i'd already bought it and besides - I now had Hercules to help me!

Here are a couple of shots taken whilst initially figuring out how I was going to line it up.



It was also pretty obvious that a previous owner liked to use an early form of front parking sensor - driving forwards until your car was resting on a kerb!!


To be honest, I hadn't noticed it on the car (well, why would you, it's mostly on the underside!), but this was bugging me.  

The paint I had bought to do the front bumper vents and door handles previously was going to get another outing.  


Not 100%, but it's still an improvement, going to be under a splitter in a place where no one will see it... but at least I know it's better!


Had one more small job to do.  A while back I had bought Powerflex bushed upper wishbones, but one of the outer bushes had never fit very well.

It was looking a bit tatty inside.


Got the centre bush out.  What a mess!


Pulled one side of the first bush out, and a load of shit came out.  Not sure if this was a fibre washer or something in the middle.  But, it was out now.



Unfortunately don't have any pics of the cleanup, but basically got the dremmel out to make the metal bush clean and shiny, all crap was removed from between the polybushes (which were actually perfect), then refit with a liberal application of brake grease.  Lovely stuff!

And one final shot of my newly refitted rear end... just because it looks lovely and clean!
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guymcc
Expert


Car: Misano RS4 B5
Power: 504ps
Torque: 604nm

Joined: 03 Jul 2010
Posts: 4441

Location: Aberdeenshire

PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:20 am Reply with quoteBack to top

another brilliant read Scott!  and yes the rear suspension looks nice and shiney!!

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ScottR
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Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:34 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Nice to know someone is still reading!


Last edited by ScottR on Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:42 am; edited 1 time in total
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FalleN
knowledgeable


Car: Cactus S4 B5 saloon
Power: stock
Torque: stock
Engine code: AGB

Joined: 06 Feb 2014
Posts: 494

Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:37 am Reply with quoteBack to top

I still do as well, love reading your b5 stories.
Looking good also haha!

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Kent
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Joined: 22 Sep 2012
Posts: 1506


PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:57 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Go Scott. Go Scott. chhhhhhyeaahhhhh!!!!

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ScottR
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Car: B5 S4

Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 8359


PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 11:11 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Kent wrote:
Go Scott. Go Scott. chhhhhhyeaahhhhh!!!!


That's more like it. Fan my ego!!
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Andy P
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Joined: 19 Oct 2011
Posts: 258


PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2015 3:50 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Love reading this thread, although it reminds me how much work my car needs to get it up to scratch  

Well done mate  
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